Online banking customers need to be on the lookout

Online banking customers in the UK need to exercise more caution due to the fact that gangs of organised criminals have been exploiting them by tricking some Internet users into paying for and downloading malicious software under the guise of anti virus protection.

According to one website sponsored by the government entitled Get Safe Online, internet criminals have been developing so-called “scareware” in order to prey on consumers that have concerns about safeguarding their computers.  These criminals do so by convincing Internet users that their computer systems have become infected.  Then, these criminals offer to fix the issue for a fee.

In news that will undoubtedly chill many UK web users to the bone, victims of the scam have to pay approximately £30 for access to a so-called “patch” download which then results in these fraudsters obtaining information such as credit card numbers, remote access permissions for the victim’s computer system, and the ability to launch untraceable phishing attacks as well.

Getsafeonline.org recently released new research that indicated nearly one out of every four adult Brits who use the world wide web have reported being approached by someone falsely claiming to be an information technology helpdesk staff member with an offer to check their computer systems for security compromises and viruses.

Minister of State for Security the Right Honorable Baroness Neville-Jones commented on the statistic by stating that the average UK web user must be made aware of the looming threat these fraudsters represent.

A joint initiative between the public sector, the Government, leading businesses, and law enforcement personnel, the Get Safe Online website aims to supply small business bank account owners and private computer users with independent, user-friendly, and free advice that will enable them to use the internet with confidence, safety, and security.

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